How not to win a girlfriend

She was 17 years old and family has said she had once dated a 24 year old man that lived in her neighborhood. But that relationship didn’t last, not uncommon in the life of a teen. She moved on to date others and allegedly Anthony Albert Gomez was jealous.

She had a dog named Chevy. Chevy was a 4 year old Australian  shepard mix. And she loved that dog. And when Chevy went missing, she was devastated. He had been missing for two weeks when a box addressed to her was found at the front door of the home she shared with her Grandmother.

Inside the box was some Valentine’s candy and a plastic garbage bag. Inside the bag was Chevy’s head.

Police have arrested Anthony Albert Gomez. He has been charged with animal cruelty and torture. Allegedly he has admitted to them that the decapitation happened in his basement. And allegedly there were video clips on his cell phone. Those clips allegedly showed the decapitation by a chainsaw. However, Gomez denies that he was the one who committed the act or that he was the one who sent the package to the girl. He also says that the girl was present when the decapitation occurred. The girl denies that she was present.

cbsnews.com                              winonadailynews.com

Pets are often the targets in a relationship gone wrong. Sometimes they are used as a threat, a threat to harm them to gain control over the other or sometimes they are used for retaliation- knowing that to cause them pain will cause pain to the ones who love them.

And thanks to Trench for posting this at Crime News for me to find.

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The Smoking Gun has more information on the story as well as a mugshot of Gomez. Allegedly Gomez now says it was done because of missing drugs.

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Thanks to AlwaysInFlyoverCountry we have an update. Anthony Albert Gomez continued to deny in court that he is the person who shot Chevy. He insists that he and an unnamed male acquaintance kidnapped the dog and that the acquaintance is the one who shot him. Then while the acquaintance dismembered the dog (at Gomez’ urging), Gomez allegedly video taped it. Gomez admitted to the prosecutor that he was aware that seeing the dog would inspire terror in the girl. Two charges that were a result of ‘disputes’ in the jail were dropped, and the charge of mistreatment of the dog was upgraded to terroristic threatening which is a stronger sentence. Gomez did plead guilty to the terroristic threats charge though the sentencing hearing hasn’t been held yet, he has agreed to a sentence of 1 year and 9 months. The prosecutor has said he will have to serve 14 months before release. Gomez did have a history of separate previous convictions for assault and domestic violence as well as a probation violation for failing to attend assigned anger management classes.

twincities.com       startribune.com

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12 Comments

  1. KatK said,

    March 24, 2007 at 3:38 am

    I hope the courts take this *VERY* seriously! It could just as easily be the next girlfriend who disappoints him to die, if he’s not locked away from society, and thus “neutralized”. I hope the girl can heal past this, and grow to have a happy and productive life, despite this. My thoughts and prayers are sent to her.

  2. AlwaysInFlyoverCountry said,

    March 25, 2007 at 1:26 am

    What grants this tale its special depravity is Chevy was the girl’s therapy dog.

    Al

    Al ias Always In Flyover Country

  3. Becky J said,

    March 25, 2007 at 2:58 am

    Therapy dog?? That just makes this story even more horrifying. This girls dog, a companion, as well as therapy, what depraved mind could even think of such an awful thing to do to someone??? That is definatly a dangerous individual, if he is not put away that girl and her family need to run far far away, he will kill her and anyone or thing that she loves, obviously…. and unfortunatly if she manages to survive him, someone else will pay for the injustice of him being set free. If he isnt sent away to prison he needs to be court committed to a mental institution for a very long time.

  4. AlwaysInFlyoverCountry said,

    March 25, 2007 at 6:03 pm

    My libertarian streak has a hard time reconciling a punitive incarceration in a mental hospital for the mentally ill or deficient. That sounds like something out of the Stalinist Soviet Union or contemporary North Korea.

    If Mr. Gomez did kill Chevy and was unable to form mens rea, the “guilty mind”, then by all means put him into a facility where he can get the treatment he requires. If, on the other hand, he killed Chevy and is shown to definitely exhibit mens rea then by all means jail him. But let’s not go tossing the sick into hospitals as punishment. That way lies the gulags.

    Al

    Al ias Always In Flyover Country

  5. KatK said,

    March 26, 2007 at 1:31 am

    Well, not as punishment Always. (I’m thinking of several cases where the murderer was mentally ill in the following musings.) If they are so ill, that they can do such things, and will do such things again, they need to be put where they cannot do such things. Some who are ill, are better when on medication, and are responsible enough to continue to take it and want to be a part of society. I have no objection to those who work to stay well, and cause no harm being in society. It’s the ones who cannot get well enough not to be a danger, or will not work to get well enough to diffuse the threat that concern me. I do think, that society has a right to expect to be protected from such threats, and that it isn’t asking too much to want those who cannot/will not get well and “play nice” to not be able to be out in society. I’m not saying execute them, I’m saying neutralize the threat by keeping them in check. (Note: I’m bipolar myself.)

  6. Becky J said,

    March 26, 2007 at 3:16 am

    I should have made myself more clear, if he is found to be mentally unstable, then he needs to be court committed, for treatment, not necessarily punishment. But there shouldnt be an option in the matter, he should be made by a judge to enter into a mental hospital to recieve treatment, so that he cannot sign himself out after only a few days or whatever. They need to evaluate him to see if he is mentally ill or if he is playing the system, i am a nurse and totally understand the mental illness side of things, i think that its a very unfortunate disease to have because you are treated unfairly by most of the world, the medical world being the worst as far as insurance companies and such, many people who could be helped arent because of those stigma’s. Out of my 14 years of nursing i have done many different nursing roles, and mental illness was the hardest, not because the patients were necessarily hard to care for but because of the limited resources and the way society as a whole portrays mental illness. So your right if the man is honestly mentally ill then he needs help, altho it needs to be court committed otherwise he may not get the help he needs or he will know it as a way to buck the system. I hope i didnt offend anyone.

  7. AlwaysInFlyoverCountry said,

    March 26, 2007 at 3:58 am

    I think we’re more in agreement than in opposition, KatK. The notion of a court ordering somebody into a mental hospital for a defined term put my back hairs up; that was what I responded to. OTOH, the court ordering a person into a mental hospital “until such a time as a psychiatrist licensed to practice in this State shall determine the patient poses no further threat to himself or the community” is much more defensable.

    Al

    Al ias Always In Flyover Country

  8. Vidalia11 said,

    March 26, 2007 at 9:05 pm

    I think this person may be psychopathic, as the box sent to the girl also had hearts and valentines in it. By psychopathic, I mean he gets gratification out of the suffering of others, and fantasizes about it in a pretty detailed manner. There is no cure for it. He is an extremely dangerous individual, imo.

  9. AlwaysInFlyoverCountry said,

    March 28, 2007 at 1:34 am

    Psychopathic personality disorder has certain salient characteristics, Vidalia. What you describe are behaviors stemming from these characteristics.

    The psychopath has no or only a very rudimentary conscience, no or only very rudimentary empathy, a low boredom threshold, and a high excitement threshold. Some psychopaths gain relief from their early-onset boredom and reach the heights of stimulation necessary for excitement by taking a struggling business and making it a success. Some do it by playing their chosen sport at a level that none other can match. Some do it by pushing laws through the legislature. These actions do not directly harm people.

    Some psychopaths, on the other hand, will seek relief from their early-onset boredom and reach the heights of stimulation necessary for excitement by destroying people’s minds, hearts, and lives. And they don’t care that they did; the person sent reeling from the psychopath’s onslaught is no more meaningful to the psychopath than yesterday’s booger-encrusted facial tissue.

    Al

    Al ias Always In Flyover Country

  10. KatK said,

    March 28, 2007 at 1:17 pm

    Again, if that is the case with this fellow, he needs to be put where he cannot cause harm. I know there are psychopaths amongst us, in positions of power. So long as they do not break the laws, and destroy people’s lives, I don’t see a problem with them being a part of society. Those who cause harm though, need to be put where they can’t do so any longer.

  11. AlwaysInFlyoverCountry said,

    September 21, 2007 at 2:08 am

    To update, Mr. Gomez admitted terroristic threats. His sentence? Twenty one months.

    Al

    Al ias Always In Flyover Country

  12. September 21, 2007 at 4:04 am

    Thank you AlwaysInFlyoverCountry for the update. I am glad they upgraded the charges and got the stronger conviction. Gomez will only be away for a relatively short time. I know this is something the victim will never be able to forget, but I hope she is able to recover from this and that she will be able to gain a lot of that recovery before he gets out. I wonder if he will get credit for time served? Whether or not he does, that 14 months will be over quickly and that doesn’t give her much time. Still it is more time than I thought he would get.


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