It can affect anyone

Lisa Dawson, 48, worked as a victim rights advocate, knew about domestic violence. She had suffered emotional abuse during her marriage which ended in 2004. And she worked with domestic violence victims, helping them to stand up against their abusers. According to Solicitor General Leslie Miller Terry “One of the reasons we hired her is because she understood the need to confront your abusers by using the criminal justice system. She herself had been involved in a relationship where there was emotional abuse”.

She had found a boyfriend, was working and was getting on with her life. But she didn’t tell her bosses. For the last 6 months, the violence from her ex-husband was escalating to the point of stalking. She had even established an escape plan. But she hadn’t yet gone to her bosses.

On Wednesday morning, Lonnie Dawson, 43 entered her home, with a key he was supposed to have given back to her. There he found Dawson and her boyfriend Kenneth Sands, 40. He murdered them with a “sharp object” and left. The murder weapon hasn’t been found.  

When Dawson didn’t show up for work, her fellow employees went looking for her. Police later found her ex-husband at a medical center getting treatment for cuts on his hand.
http://www.news-daily.com/homepage/local_story_081215623.html?keyword=leadpicturestory

http://www.11alive.com/news/news_article.aspx?storyid=77667

Domestic violence is very real. And it doesn’t always end when the marraige does. Sometimes, ending the marraige sometimes makes it worse. Did Lisa know or fear what the ending might be? I have no way of knowing. But she had to have known of the possibilities. Would a restraining order have helped here? One of her friends says no. And the truth is, a restraining order often doesn’t work in abusive situations. A person bent on assault or murder, usually won’t worry about what the courts will do if they break a restraining order. They know they are going to go to jail anyway.

 

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Sometimes kids disappoint the parents

She was 17. Her name is Ashley Kathleen Boyd. Like many kids do at that age, she went to the mall. What happened afterwards has been pretty well documented.

While she was there, she called another friend Wayne Anthony Williams, 18 to come and pick her up. At some point they met with two other men, Jamal Rashaad Brothers, 19, and Naquean Montearious Johnson, 19 and worked out a plan to rob her parents. They drove to the neighborhood and waited for them to come home. Boyd went to the door and rang the bell. When her mother Paula Faye Brooks, 50 answered the door, Boyd pulled out a gun her mother struggled with her and was shot hitting her in the foot. Her mother tried to escape, and Boyd shot her in the head. Her father, Joseph Boyd was taking a nap, but went to see what was wrong when he heard the gunshots. Boyd shot at him 3 times and missed. He managed to call 911, as Boyd took off. She was found 3 hours later by police.

She was charged with first degree murder, but pled guilty to 2nd degree murder and one count each of attempted robbery with a dangerous weapon, conspiracy to commit robbery with a dangerous weapon and assault with a deadly weapon with intent to kill. She was sentenced to four consecutive sentences: 185 to 231 months (about 15 to 19 years) for second-degree murder; 61 to 83 months (about five to seven years) for attempted robbery with a dangerous weapon; and two sentences of 23 to 37 months (about two to three years each) for assault with a deadly weapon with intent to kill and conspiracy to commit a robbery. She recieved credit for the 367 days she had already spent in jail.

Her words to the court were “My parents tried to tell me the right thing, and I didn’t listen,” Boyd said in Cabarrus County Superior Court Tuesday. “I regret what happened. … I ruined my mom’s life. I ruined my life, and I ruined my dad’s life.”

Her father is disappointed in such a long sentence for his daughter. “I’m almost 61, and I would like to have seen her get out while I’m still alive,” he said in court. “I would have liked to have seen the other charges run concurrently.”

http://www.charlotte.com/mld/observer/14156244.htm

I feel for this father. He has not only lost his wife, it was at his daughter’s hand. How confusing would that be. Your wife being coldly and brutally murdered, but trying to be protective of the daughter he loved. She not only shot and killed her mother, she tried to kill him.

When a child is born, most parents vow to protect them. To them if to no one else, their children are the bright and shining future. Often parents will defend their child even in spite of any evidence before them. But after a time, children begin doing their own thing, and sadly many times parents are disappointed. Though not usually in such a horrific way.

Carnival of True Crime Blogs

Every week the True Crime Blogs hold a carnival. This is where one of the members gathers up samples of the other bloggers content and hosts it on their site. This is a great way to check out other blogs, for your viewing pleasure. I am not afaid to say that the blogroll I belong to is a great group of intelligent, caring, and concerned group and they are great writers. So I encourage everyone to check out the sixteenth Carnival which is being hosted at Randomized Drivel this week.

http://randomizeddrivel.blogspot.com/